What to consider when moving to a new state?

What to consider when moving to a new state?

Moving doesn’t always imply that you would be on the other end of the country or in another continent. Moving can be in the same city or a city, town or district nearby. When you are moving locally, there isn’t much that changes. You would still adhere to the same federal and state laws. You will drive along the same landscape and enjoy or dislike the same weather. You would know what’s where exactly and you will also know the insiders’ secrets to have the best time in that city, town or state. Moving to a new state is a different ballgame altogether. Interstate moves can be amazing or they can be very disappointing. You need to make an informed decision and for that you need to know what you should be considering before finalizing interstate moves.

  • First, consider the cost of living. In most states, cities or towns and districts that are located nearby would have similar costs of living. The major cities are an exception. If you let aside New York or the likes of Chicago and LA, then most cities would have similar costs of living across the suburban areas and beyond. When you move to a new state, the cost of living can change substantially. You cannot even compare the cost of living of New York and Iowa or Missouri and Hawaii. You may get a new job that pays well and you may be getting a lot of perks or a great business opportunity. That additional income may fizzle out before you realize if you get a shock with the cost of living.
  • Consider the weather in the new state. Unless you are just crossing the state border and there isn’t a great geographical difference, you need to be conscious of the weather extremes and even the usual climate. Many people moving to Seattle don’t realize how gloomy all that rain, clouds and moist overcast days and nights can get. Romanticizing the rain is one thing; living with it perennially is a completely different scenario.
  • Focus on the social life. Interstate moves will possibly change the way you party, mingle with your friends, neighbors or colleagues and it can either be for the better or for the worse. If it stays unchanged then you are lucky. Also consider everything that your family would need, from schools to recreation and see if the new state or city ticks those checkboxes.
  • Finally, consider the state laws. Federal laws will apply anyway. You need to be aware of the state tax laws and all other statutes that will directly affect you.